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Program Overview

Pregraduate Business Administration

Pregraduate Business Administration Certificate

The Pregraduate Business Administration post-baccalaureate certificate prepares students for the core curriculum of many graduate business schools, including MBA programs. Courses in a range of business-related subjects give students an advantage in the competitive application process and environment of graduate business study. If students are interested in applying to graduate business schools, it is recommended that they first examine the admission requirements of the program or programs to which they plan to apply to guide them in their decisions about course enrollment at SPS.

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About the Pregraduate Business Administration Certificate

Pregraduate Business Administration Goals and Courses

Additional Information

Students who want to pursue completely customized study for business school preparation might also want to consider a Specialized Studies program.

Pregraduate Business Administration Tuition

Post-baccalaureate students at Northwestern's School of Professional Studies pay per course. For more information about financial obligations and tuition, please visit the Tuition page.

Admission for Pregraduate Business Administration

In addition to completing an online application, you'll also need to submit a few supplemental materials. A list of requirements for admission including application deadlines and tips on how to apply can be found on the Admission page.

Pregraduate Business Administration Registration Information

Whether you're a first-time registrant or current and returning student, all students register using our online student registration and records systems. Important information about registering for courses at SPS, including registration timelines and adding or dropping courses in which you are already enrolled, can be found on the Registration Information page.

Find out more about the Pregraduate Business Administration Program

Program Courses:Course Detail
Intro to Financial Accounting <> ACCOUNT 201-CN

The content of this course is designed to provide students with a firm understanding of the financial accounting process, to include identifying, recording and communicating accounting information to external users. The course will discuss Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), and explain how their framework fosters the relevance and reliability of financial statements. Students can expect an introduction to the techniques of accounting and the accounting profession with an emphasis on organizing information for decision making and the information needs of creditors and equity holders. Topics include financial statements, transaction analysis, accrual accounting, cash management, inventories, receivables, long-term and intangible assets, liabilities, stockholders' equity, cash flow statements, and financial statement analysis.


View ACCOUNT 201-CN Sections
Intro to Financial Accounting <> ACCOUNT 201-DL

The content of the course is designed to provide students with a firm understanding of the financial accounting process, and to include identifying, recording and communicating accounting information to external users. The course will discuss Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and explain how their framework fosters the relevance and reliability of financial statements. Students can expect an introduction to the techniques of accounting and the accounting profession with an emphasis on organizing information for decision making and the information needs of creditors and equity holders. Topics include financial statements, transaction analysis, accrual accounting, cash management, inventories, receivables, long-term and intangible assets, liabilities, stockholders' equity, cash flow statements, and financial statement analysis.

This course is conducted completely online. A technology fee will be added to tuition.


View ACCOUNT 201-DL Sections
Intro to Managerial Accounting <> ACCOUNT 202-DL

A continuation of the introduction to accounting, with emphasis on providing relevant and timely accounting information and analysis to managers for use in planning, decision making, and controlling strategic operational objectives. Topics include the classifications of costs and different ways of reporting and analyzing those costs; the operating budgeting process; capital budgeting; and job-order, standard, process, and activity-based costing systems. Prerequisite: ACCOUNT 201.

This course is conducted completely online. A technology fee will be added to tuition.


View ACCOUNT 202-DL Sections
Introduction to Macroeconomics <> ECON 201-CN

This course is an introduction to economics with emphasis on macroeconomics. The course covers aspects of general economics that everyone should know, including how the market system works, how prices are determined, why shortages and surpluses occur, and why some people earn high incomes and others earn low incomes. Topics include: supply and demand, competition vs. monopoly, inflation, unemployment, recessions, booms, fiscal and monetary policy, budget deficits, international trade, and exchange rates. Prerequisite: two years of high school mathematics or MATH 101.


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Introduction to Macroeconomics <> ECON 201-CN

This course familiarizes students with the basic principles of macroeconomics including the role of the government, the role of banks, the importance of interest rates, and the effects of policies involving trade, tax, and other concepts. A variety of economic topics will be covered, including why auction markets are so common, why countries would desire to trade with one another, how currencies are valued and traded, why shortages and surpluses occur, and why some people earn high incomes while others earn low incomes. Also discussed will be classificatory and taxonomical concepts and the role of classifications and rankings. Topics include: supply and demand, competition vs. monopoly, inflation, unemployment, recessions, booms and recessions, fiscal and monetary policy, budget deficits, international trade, and exchange rates. A basic understanding of descriptive statistics, while helpful, is not required.


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Introduction to Economics II: Microeconomics <> ECON 202-CN

In a market economy, the interaction of buyers and sellers in many connected markets governs how the economy's resources are allocated. Market prices are determined by the decisions of all consumers and firms but mostly taken as given by any individual. We will construct models of the behavior of consumers and firms, and of the determination of prices in markets under a variety of conditions. We will examine the properties of the allocations, especially their efficiency, and the role of the government in these matters. Prerequisite: ECON 201.


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Introduction to Economics II: Microeconomics <> ECON 202-CN

This course emphasizes economic principles used to analyze individual and firm behavior. Students will be introduced to core terminology and modes of analysis for studying the production and distribution of goods and services. An overarching goal is to gain insight into when, why, and how markets fail or succeed. Specific topics include gains from trade, supply and demand, elasticity, externalities, costs of production, perfect competition, and monopoly. Prerequisite: ECON 201.


There is no available section.
Introduction to Finance <> FINANCE 202-CN

An introductory course covering the basic concepts and models used in finance. Explores the mathematics and spreadsheet modeling techniques used in evaluating various financial assets, including stocks and bonds. Also surveys the risk-return tradeoff in financial markets and how investors gauge risk, as well as the basic concepts of Markowitz's mean-variance portfolio theory. The nature and impact of interest-rate risk on financial institutions is considered, and the duration of a financial asset is introduced in this context. Introduces the efficient market hypothesis and its implications for personal investing and corporate finance. Prerequisite: MATH 101, STAT 202, or college algebra, statistics, financial accounting, microeconomics, and macroeconomics, or equivalents. Carries business credit.


View FINANCE 202-CN Sections
Corporate Finance <> FINANCE 360-CN

This course covers capital budgeting, or how corporate managers determine where to invest a company's funds; how companies determine what an appropriate discount rate would be for a given capital investment; the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) and the Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT) models used to estimate a firm's cost of equity, along with a detailed consideration of how beta is estimated for the CAPM; how a company derives its weighted average cost of capital (WACC); the dividend policy decision; and capital structure theory. Financial planning models will also be considered in depth. This course also covers the adjustments typically made to financial statement data to accommodate the needs and viewpoints of financial analysts and investors. Finally, we examine the topic of corporate risk management (hedging techniques). Prerequisite: FINANCE 202 or equivalent.


View FINANCE 360-CN Sections
Algebra <> MATH 101-CN

This course is designed to provide an overview of core mathematical concepts that permeate business, science and everyday life. The primary focus is on mathematical tools needed in a variety of degree programs. Topics include: functions and graphs, linear, polynomial and rational equations, inequalities and their applications, modeling, variation, and systems of equations. This course does not count for credit if taken after any higher mathematics course. May not be audited.


View MATH 101-CN Sections
Algebra <> MATH 101-DL

This course is designed to provide an overview of core mathematical concepts that permeate business, science and everyday life. The primary focus is on mathematical tools needed in a variety of degree programs. Topics include: functions and graphs, linear, polynomial and rational equations, inequalities and their applications, modeling, variation, and systems of equations. The course does not count for credit if taken after any higher mathematics course. May not be audited.

This course is conducted completely online. A technology fee will be added to tuition. 


View MATH 101-DL Sections
Differential Calculus of One Variable Functions <> MATH 220-CN

This course covers definition of a function; trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic and inverse functions; graphs, limits, continuity; derivative of a function; product, quotient and chain rule; implicit differentiation; linear approximation and differentials; related rates; mean value theorems; curve plotting; optimization problems; Newton's method; and antiderivatives. Prerequisite: three years of high school math, including trigonometry, or MATH 113.


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Principles of Marketing <> MKTG 201-DL

Marketing structure and processes whereby products proceed from the place of production to final use or consumption. Sales management, retailing, foreign trade, advertising, channels of distribution for marketing different types of products, activities of wholesale and retail middlemen and other important marketing institutions, cooperative marketing, market risk, sources of marketing information, price determination, governmental activity related to marketing, cost of marketing, and general critique of market structure.

 

This course is conducted completely online. A technology fee will be added to tuition.

 

 


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Organization Behavior <> ORG_BEH 301-CN

The interaction of individuals in formal organizations; theory and research integrated with cases and exercises to develop an understanding of the dynamics of motivation, communication, group decision making, leadership, intergroup relations, power, and conflict. Students are encouraged to apply this knowledge to managing relationships with superiors, subordinates, and colleagues in their own work settings.


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Introduction to Statistics STAT 202-CN

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of statistics. Throughout the course, students will learn to: summarize data using graphs and tables; explain/calculate descriptive statistics, confidence intervals, correlation, regression, and probability; and explain tests of significance and data-production including sampling and experiments. Basic knowledge of algebra is recommended.


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